We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 5 (TMF:810)

Peace to Live By: We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 5 (TMF:810) - Daniel Litton
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       God is not tolerant, and he does not ultimately put up with the evil things people think and do, nor the false religions they practice. God is shown to be right with what he has said to be true, at the end of time. Now, American society, or any other society in our world, may make people believe they have rights that they don’t really have, like gay rights. No one, in reality, has the ‘right’ to be gay—to engage in homosexual acts. People have the ability to practice homosexuality, but they do not have the ‘right.’ Neither should a Christian believe that it is good for people to have these rights. There is no area of life, including government, where God’s ways are not to be taken into account. If I were to say that I believe it’s good for people to have ‘gay’ rights within a governmental system, I would in fact be sinning against God and going against the Truth. Now, this doesn’t mean I stop people from practicing what they are going to practice, for God has told us it is his responsibility to judge unbelievers (see 1 Corinthians 5).

We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 4 (TMF:809)

Peace to Live By: We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 4 (TMF:809) - Daniel Litton
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       Again, God will judge all people for their behaviors. The Apostle Paul noted the following in Romans 2: “He [God] will render to each one according to his works: to those who by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life; but for those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, there will be wrath and fury. There will be tribulation and distress for every human being who does evil, the Jew first and also the Greek, but glory and honor and peace for everyone who does good, the Jew first and also the Greek. For God shows no partiality” (Romans 2:6-11, ESV). Notice how Paul said punishment is “for every human being who does evil.” This is not just for those who call themselves Christians who do evil, but for all humans who have ever existed, regardless of religion.

We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 3 (TMF:808)

Peace to Live By: We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 3 (TMF:808) - Daniel Litton
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       A person has the ability to have sexual relations with another person—the ability to commit fornication—considering both individuals are not married. A person also has the ability to commit adultery with another person. A person too has the ability to engage in homosexual behaviors with another person. But, none of these people have the ‘right’ to do these things. They just have the ability. As the Bible says, “We know that the judgment of God rightly falls on those who practice such things” (Romans 2:2, ESV). God, in his system, has allowed, or permitted for the ability to perform these behaviors which he has said not to do. Now, if people had the ‘right’ to do these things, then God has no ‘right’ to judge them for doing them. Again, a right is an entitlement that is good, right, and true, that which is approved by God. If people have the ‘right’ to do them, then they aren’t doing anything wrong. But, we as Christians know that no ‘real’ rights exist outside of what God has said is good, right, and true.

We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 2 (TMF:807)

Peace to Live By: We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 2 (TMF:807) - Daniel Litton
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       Jesus said, “And he [God] has given him [the Son] authority to execute judgment, because he is the Son of Man. Do not marvel at this, for an hour is coming when all who are in the tombs will hear his voice and come out, those who have done good to the resurrection of life, and those who have done evil to the resurrection of judgment” (John 5:27-29, ESV). So, every person who has ever existed will bow his or her knees to the real God, Jesus Christ, and give an account of his or her life to him. Let’s look at actions people do, for example. A person has the ability to have sexual relations with another person—the ability to commit fornication—considering both individuals are not married. A person also has the ability to commit adultery with another person. A person too has the ability to engage in homosexual behaviors with another person. But, none of these people have the ‘right’ to do these things. They just have the ability.

We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 1 (TMF:806)

Peace to Live By: We Have the 'Right' to Believe What We Want? Part 1 (TMF:806) - Daniel Litton
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       Contention two: “Everyone has a right to believe whatever he or she wants.” Now, many people do believe that even if people don’t follow Christianity, that they have the ‘right’ to believe whatever they want to believe. Actually, though, this argument is not true. A person has the ‘ability’ to believe what he or she wants, but the person does not have the ‘right.’ A right is an entitlement that is good, right, and true—that which is endowed by God. If people have ‘rights’ to believe what they want, then God cannot judge them for believing what they want to believe. This is because, after all, they have the ‘right’ to believe it. However, if people do not have the right, yet have the ‘ability,’ God can and will judge people for incorrect beliefs. Jesus said, “And he [God] has given him [the Son] authority to execute judgment, because he is the Son of Man. Do not marvel at this, for an hour is coming when all who are in the tombs will hear his voice and come out, those who have done good to the resurrection of life, and those who have done evil to the resurrection of judgment” (John 5:27-29, ESV).

People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 4 (TMF:805)

Peace to Live By: People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 4 (TMF:805) - Daniel Litton
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       People can just do whatever they want, no matter what, and should not expect, or face, any judgment for such actions if there is no absolute truth. But one might say that there needs to be order to society—that is why we have rules. But that doesn’t make sense. If there is no absolute truth, then order doesn’t exist. And if order doesn’t exist, then why, in turn, do we need order? Here again, we see that the very need for order suggests, or gives away the fact that absolute truth does indeed exist. Where there is order, there is design, right? Well, that makes good sense, though, some believe that order can just come about naturally. But the extreme order of things we see around us, with nature, the earth, and the universe, betrays the very notion that things could have come about naturally. That would be like winning the lottery trillions of times over. The Bible says about mankind: “For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made” (Romans 1:19, 20, ESV).

People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 3 (TMF:804)

Peace to Live By: People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 3 (TMF:804) - Daniel Litton
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       Even if the majority thinks that physically hurting others is not okay, why does the majority’s view undercut the beliefs of the one who thinks it’s okay? We see here, pretty easily then, that this kind of thinking—this logic—isn’t really logical at all. It is not logical to say that whatever a person wants to believe, it is okay for him or her to believe it. This kind of thinking might appear to be wise on the surface, but really isn’t well-thought-out when it is broken down and analyzed. Now, if you believe there is no absolute truth, then why do you follow any rules? It’s every person for him or herself if no absolute truth exists in our world. People can just do whatever they want, no matter what, and should not expect, or face, any judgment for such actions if there is no absolute truth. But one might say that there needs to be order to society—that is why we have rules. But that doesn’t make sense. If there is no absolute truth, then order doesn’t exist. And if order doesn’t exist, then why, in turn, do we need order?

People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 2 (TMF:803)

Peace to Live By: People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 2 (TMF:803) - Daniel Litton
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       It doesn’t make sense, though, in matters of absolute truth or morality, for a person to say he or she can believe what he or she would like to. It’s not reasonable to say a person can believe what he or she personally ‘thinks’ is good. For instance, a person may believe that physically harming other people randomly is okay, whereas most others would say it is not okay. But if we ascribe to the logic that everyone can believe what is okay for them, then how can we correct the person who thinks that physically hurting others randomly is okay? Even if the majority thinks that physically hurting others is not okay, why does the majority’s view undercut the beliefs of the one who thinks it’s okay? We see here, pretty easily then, that this kind of thinking—this logic—isn’t really logical at all. It is not logical to say that whatever a person wants to believe, it is okay for him or her to believe it. This kind of thinking might appear to be wise on the surface, but really isn’t well-thought-out when it is broken down and analyzed.

People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 1 (TMF:802)

Peace to Live By: People Can Just Believe What They Want? Part 1 (TMF:802) - Daniel Litton
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       So, first, contention one: “I can believe what I want. Whatever I personally think, that’s ok for me.” This argument sounds good at first glance, and it is very tolerant of what other people may believe. But when examining the logic behind this type of thinking, it becomes clear, rather quickly, that this kind of thinking isn’t that logical. First, it is true that people can believe what they want to believe about certain things. I can say, “I like apples.” And another person can say, “I don’t like apples.” Both of these statements would be true for the people speaking them (considering each person is telling the truth). Things like the food we like to eat are a matter of personal preference. This personal preference exists because God has created and said that apples are okay to eat. Because they are a food provided from God, one can decide whether or not he or she likes apples. Now, if apples existed but God said it was a sin to eat an apple, people could still like to eat apples, and could in fact eat them. However, it would still be wrong to eat apples regardless of what a person liked.

Intro to Attacks on Christianity- 'Free Thinking' (TMF:801)

Peace to Live By: Intro to Attacks on Christianity- 'Free Thinking' (TMF:801) - Daniel Litton
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       A lot of people want to reject Christianity, or any religion, simply because they feel it places rules on people where there shouldn’t be rules. And some feel that all religions are simply the creations of mankind in order to seemingly provide an explanation of life—why life exists and sometimes why the universe exists. Religion, to them, is just make-believe to help people get through and cope with life. When I am talking about this ‘free’ thinking, I mean these people want to be ‘free’ from any restraint upon themselves, any restrictions on their behavior and thinking. Let us go through these contentions one-by-one as we seek to understand people’s errors when it comes to these lines of thinking. So, first, contention one: “I can believe what I want. Whatever I personally think, that’s ok for me.” This argument sounds good at first glance, and it is very tolerant of what other people may believe. But when examining the logic behind this type of thinking, it becomes clear, rather quickly, that this kind of thinking isn’t that logical.